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Genetic abnormalities in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: where we are and where we go.

Authors
  • Puiggros, Anna
  • Blanco, Gonzalo
  • Espinet, Blanca
Type
Published Article
Journal
BioMed Research International
Publisher
Hindawi Limited
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2014
Volume
2014
Pages
435983–435983
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1155/2014/435983
PMID: 24967369
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Chromosomal abnormalities in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are detected in up to 80% of patients. Among them, deletions of 11q, 13q, 17p, and trisomy 12 have a known prognostic value and play an important role in CLL pathogenesis and evolution, determining patients outcome and therapeutic strategies. Standard methods used to identify these genomic aberrations include both conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CGC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Although FISH analyses have been implemented as the gold standard, CGC allows the identification of chromosomal translocations and complex karyotypes, the latest associated with poor outcome. Genomic arrays have a higher resolution that allows the detection of cryptic abnormalities, although these have not been fully implemented in routine laboratories. In the last years, next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have identified a wide range of gene mutations (e.g., TP53, NOTCH1, SF3B1, and BIRC3) which have improved our knowledge about CLL development, allowing us to refine both the prognostic subgroups and better therapeutic strategies. Clonal evolution has also recently arisen as a key point in CLL, integrating cytogenetic alterations and mutations in a dynamic model that improve our understanding about its clinical course and relapse.

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