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Gene Silencing Through CRISPR Interference in Bacteria: Current Advances and Future Prospects

Authors
  • Zhang, Riyu1
  • Xu, Wensheng2
  • Shao, Shuai1
  • Wang, Qiyao1, 3, 4
  • 1 State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai , (China)
  • 2 Laboratory of Agricultural Product Detection and Control of Spoilage Organisms and Pesticide Residue, Faculty of Food Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Agriculture, Beijing , (China)
  • 3 Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center for Biomanufacturing Technology, Shanghai , (China)
  • 4 Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Maricultured Animal Vaccines, Shanghai , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Frontiers in Microbiology
Publisher
Frontiers Media SA
Publication Date
Mar 31, 2021
Volume
12
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2021.635227
Source
Frontiers
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Microbiology
  • Mini Review
License
Green

Abstract

Functional genetic screening is an important method that has been widely used to explore the biological processes and functional annotation of genetic elements. CRISPR/Cas (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat sequences/CRISPR-associated protein) is the newest tool in the geneticist’s toolbox, allowing researchers to edit a genome with unprecedented ease, accuracy, and high-throughput. Most recently, CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) has been developed as an emerging technology that exploits the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) and single-guide RNA (sgRNA) to repress sequence-specific genes. In this review, we summarized the characteristics of the CRISPRi system, such as programmable, highly efficient, and specific. Moreover, we demonstrated its applications in functional genetic screening and highlighted its potential to dissect the underlying mechanism of pathogenesis. The recent development of the CRISPRi system will provide a high-throughput, practical, and efficient tool for the discovery of functionally important genes in bacteria.

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