Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Reflux Esophagitis in a Predominantly Hispanic Population of a Large Safety-Net Hospital.

Authors
  • Haghighat, Shida1
  • Park, Caron2, 3
  • Horwich, Brian1
  • Liu, Yao1
  • Soffer, Edy1
  • Idos, Gregory4
  • Shaker, Anisa5
  • 1 Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90033, USA.
  • 2 Southern California Clinical and Translational Science Institute (SC-CTSI), Los Angeles, CA, 90033, USA.
  • 3 Department of Preventative Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90033, USA.
  • 4 City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, CA, USA.
  • 5 Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California, 2011 Zonal Avenue, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Digestive Diseases and Sciences
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2021
Volume
66
Issue
6
Pages
1940–1948
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10620-020-06482-1
PMID: 32691385
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Defining factors associated with severe reflux esophagitis allows for identification of subgroups most at risk for complications of strictures and esophageal malignancy. We hypothesized there might be unique clinical features in patients with reflux esophagitis in a predominantly Hispanic population of a large, safety-net hospital. Define clinical and endoscopic features of reflux esophagitis in a predominantly Hispanic population of a large, safety-net hospital. This is retrospective comparative study of outpatients and hospitalized patients identified with mild (Los Angeles Grade A/B) and severe (Los Angeles Grade C/D) esophagitis through an endoscopy database review. The electronic medical record was reviewed for demographic and clinical data. Reflux esophagitis was identified in 382/5925 individuals: 56.5% males and 79.8% Hispanic. Multivariable logistic regression model adjusted for age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI), tobacco and alcohol use, and hospitalization status with severity as the outcome showed an interaction between gender and BMI (p ≤ 0.01). Stratification by gender showed that obese females had decreased odds of severe esophagitis compared to normal BMI females (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.07-0.47; p < 0.01). In males, the odds of esophagitis were higher in inpatient status (OR = 2.84, 95% CI = 1.52 - 5.28; p < 0.01) and as age increased (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.03 - 1.83; p = 0.03). We identify gender-specific associations with severe esophagitis in a predominantly Hispanic cohort. In females, obese BMI appears to be protective against severe esophagitis compared to normal BMI, while in men inpatient status and increasing age were associated with increased odds of severe esophagitis.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times