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Gender Stereotypes: Children's Perceptions of Future Compensatory Behavior Following Violations of Gender Roles

Authors
  • Hughes, Farrah M.1
  • Seta, Catherine E.1
  • 1 Wake Forest University, Department of Psychology, Winston-Salem, North Carolina , Winston-Salem
Type
Published Article
Journal
Sex Roles
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2003
Volume
49
Issue
11-12
Pages
685–691
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1023/B:SERS.0000003341.73966.61
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
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Abstract

Fifth-grade students were exposed to descriptions of men and women performing behaviors that were mildly inconsistent or highly inconsistent with traditional gender stereotypes. They then rated the likelihood that the person who performed the action (the deviant target) and another person (a fellow group member) would subsequently perform a gender-consistent behavior. The results indicated that children exposed to inconsistent information about a male target expected another man to perform a highly gender-consistent behavior. This expectation was not observed with respect to female targets. These findings were predicted from Seta and Seta's schema-maintenance through compensation analysis (e.g., Seta & Seta, 1993) and support this model's assumption that stereotype violations can result in the generation of compensatory expectancies that may help maintain extant stereotypic beliefs. In addition, the results suggest that these processes are intact rather early in gender-role development.

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