Gel-liquid crystalline transition of some multilamellar lipid bilayers follows classical kinetics with a fractional dimensionality of approximately two.

Affordable Access

Gel-liquid crystalline transition of some multilamellar lipid bilayers follows classical kinetics with a fractional dimensionality of approximately two.

Publication Date
Nov 01, 1991
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Mathematics
  • Physics
License
Unknown

Abstract

The relaxation kinetics of the gel-liquid crystalline transition of phosphatidylcholine (DC14PC, DC16PC, and DC18PC) multilamellar vesicles have been examined using volume-perturbation calorimetry. The time-dependent temperature and pressure changes associated with a periodic volume perturbation are monitored in real time. Data collected in the time domain are transformed to the frequency domain using Fourier series representations of the perturbation and response functions. Because a very small perturbation is imposed during the experiment, linear response theory is suitable for analysis of the relaxation process. The Laplace transform of the classical Kolmogorov-Avrami relation of transition kinetics is used to describe the dynamic response in the frequency domain. For DC14PC and DC16PC, the relaxation process is better fit with an effective dimensionality of n = 2 rather than n = 1. For DC18PC, we estimate that an effective dimensionality of approximately 1.5 will best fit the data. These results indicate that the gel-liquid crystalline transition of these lipid bilayers follows the classical Kolmogorov-Avrami kinetic model with an effective dimensionality greater than 1 and the assumption of simple exponential decay (n = 1) commonly used in data analysis may not always be valid for lipid transitions. Insofar as the dimensionality of the relaxation reflects the geometry of fluctuating lipid clusters, this parameter may be useful in connecting experimental thermodynamic and kinetic results with those obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times