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Gel-based proteomics reveals potential novel protein markers of ozone stress in leaves of cultivated bean and maize species of Panama.

Authors
  • Torres, Nilka Lineth
  • Cho, Kyoungwon
  • Shibato, Junko
  • Hirano, Misato
  • Kubo, Akihiro
  • Masuo, Yoshinori
  • Iwahashi, Hitoshi
  • Jwa, Nam-Soo
  • Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar
  • Rakwal, Randeep
Type
Published Article
Journal
Electrophoresis
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2007
Volume
28
Issue
23
Pages
4369–4381
Identifiers
PMID: 17987633
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We examined responses of cultivated bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. IDIAP R-3) and maize (Zea mays L. cv. Guarare 8128) plants exposed to ozone (O(3)) using a leaf injury assessment and proteomics approach. Plants grown for 16 days in greenhouse were transferred to an O(3) chamber and exposed continuously to 0.2 ppm O(3) or filtered pollutant-free air for up to 72 h. CBB-stained gels revealed changes in ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) protein. By Western analysis changes in marker proteins for O(3) damage in leaves by 1-DE were checked. In bean leaves, two superoxide dismutase (SOD) protein (19 and 20 kDa) were dramatically decreased, while ascorbate peroxidase (APX, 25 kDa), small heat shock protein (HSP, 33 kDa), and a naringenin-7-O-methyltransferase (NOMT, 42 kDa) were increased by O(3). In maize leaves, expression levels of catalase (increased), SOD (decreased), and APX (increased) were drastically changed by O(3) depending on the leaf stage, whereas crossreacting HSPs (24 and 30 kDa) and NOMT (41 kDa) proteins were strongly increased in O(3)-stressed younger leaves. These results indicated a clear modulation of oxidative stress-, heat shock-, and secondary metabolism-related proteins by O(3). Finally, 2-DE at 72 h after O(3) exposure revealed changes (induction/suppression) in expression levels of 25 and 12 protein spots in bean and maize leaves, respectively. Out of these, ten and nine nonredundant proteins in bean and maize, respectively, were identified by MS. A novel pathogenesis-related protein 2 may serve as a potential marker for O(3) stress in bean.

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