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The future of upper extremity rehabilitation robotics: research and practice

Authors
  • Vu, Philip P.1, 2
  • Chestek, Cynthia A.1, 3, 4, 5
  • Nason, Samuel R.1
  • Kung, Theodore A.2
  • Kemp, Stephen W.P.1, 2
  • Cederna, Paul S.1, 2
  • 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • 2 Section of Plastic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • 3 Robotics Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • 4 Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • 5 Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Type
Published Article
Journal
Muscle & Nerve
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
61
Issue
6
Pages
708–718
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/mus.26860
PMID: 32413247
PMCID: PMC7868083
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Unknown

Abstract

The loss of upper limb motor function can have a devastating effect on people’s lives. To restore upper limb control and functionality, researchers and clinicians have developed interfaces to interact directly with the human body’s motor system. In this invited review, we aim to provide details on the peripheral nerve interfaces and brain-machine interfaces that have been developed in the past 30 years for upper extremity control, and we highlight the challenges that still remain to transition the technology into the clinical market. The findings show that peripheral nerve interfaces and brain-machine interfaces have many similar characteristics that enable them to be concurrently developed. Decoding neural information from both interfaces may lead to novel physiological models that may one day fully restore upper limb motor function for a growing patient population.

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