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The functions of gender role traditionality, ambivalent sexism, injury, and frequency of assault on domestic violence perception: a study between Japanese and American college students.

Authors
  • Yamawaki, Niwako1
  • Ostenson, Joseph
  • Brown, C Ryan
  • 1 Department of Psychology, Brigham Young University (BYU), Provo, UT, USA
Type
Published Article
Journal
Violence against women
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2009
Volume
15
Issue
9
Pages
1126–1142
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1077801209340758
PMID: 19675366
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study examined the mediating influence of gender-role traditionality (GRT), ambivalent sexism, and victim injury and frequency of assault on domestic violence (DV) perception differences between Japanese and American college students. As predicted, Japanese tended to minimize, blame, and excuse DV more than did Americans, and these national differences were mediated by GRT. Participants viewed the DV incident more seriously when the victim presented injury or when the incident had occurred frequently. Those high in benevolent and hostile sexism were more likely to minimize DV, whereas those high only in benevolent sexism were more likely to blame the victim.

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