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Functional architecture of neural circuits for leg proprioception in Drosophila.

Authors
  • Chen, Chenghao1
  • Agrawal, Sweta2
  • Mark, Brandon2
  • Mamiya, Akira2
  • Sustar, Anne2
  • Phelps, Jasper S3
  • Lee, Wei-Chung Allen3
  • Dickson, Barry J4
  • Card, Gwyneth M4
  • Tuthill, John C5
  • 1 Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, 1705 N.E. Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA; Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 19700 Helix Drive, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.
  • 2 Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, 1705 N.E. Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
  • 3 Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School, 220 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
  • 4 Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 19700 Helix Drive, Ashburn, VA 20147, USA.
  • 5 Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Washington, 1705 N.E. Pacific Street, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current biology : CB
Publication Date
Dec 06, 2021
Volume
31
Issue
23
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2021.09.035
PMID: 34637749
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To effectively control their bodies, animals rely on feedback from proprioceptive mechanosensory neurons. In the Drosophila leg, different proprioceptor subtypes monitor joint position, movement direction, and vibration. Here, we investigate how these diverse sensory signals are integrated by central proprioceptive circuits. We find that signals for leg joint position and directional movement converge in second-order neurons, revealing pathways for local feedback control of leg posture. Distinct populations of second-order neurons integrate tibia vibration signals across pairs of legs, suggesting a role in detecting external substrate vibration. In each pathway, the flow of sensory information is dynamically gated and sculpted by inhibition. Overall, our results reveal parallel pathways for processing of internal and external mechanosensory signals, which we propose mediate feedback control of leg movement and vibration sensing, respectively. The existence of a functional connectivity map also provides a resource for interpreting connectomic reconstruction of neural circuits for leg proprioception. Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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