Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Functional antibodies against VAR2CSA in nonpregnant populations from colombia exposed to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax.

Authors
  • Gnidehou, Sedami
  • Doritchamou, Justin
  • Arango, Eliana M
  • Cabrera, Ana
  • Arroyo, Maria Isabel
  • Kain, Kevin C
  • Ndam, Nicaise Tuikue
  • Maestre, Amanda
  • Yanow, Stephanie K
Type
Published Article
Journal
Infection and Immunity
Publisher
American Society for Microbiology
Publication Date
May 2014
Volume
82
Issue
6
Pages
2565–2573
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1128/IAI.01594-14
PMID: 24686068
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

In pregnancy, parity-dependent immunity is observed in response to placental infection with Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies recognize the surface antigen, VAR2CSA, expressed on infected red blood cells and inhibit cytoadherence to the placental tissue. In most settings of malaria endemicity, antibodies against VAR2CSA are predominantly observed in multigravid women and infrequently in men, children, and nulligravid women. However, in Colombia, we detected antibodies against multiple constructs of VAR2CSA among men and children with acute P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax infection. The majority of men and children (>60%) had high levels of IgGs against three recombinant domains of VAR2CSA: DBL5ε, DBL3X, and ID1-ID2. Surprisingly, these antibodies were observed only in pregnant women, men, and children exposed either to P. falciparum or to P. vivax. Moreover, the anti-VAR2CSA antibodies are of high avidity and efficiently inhibit adherence of infected red blood cells to chondroitin sulfate A in vitro, suggesting that they are specific and functional. These unexpected results suggest that there may be genotypic or phenotypic differences in the parasites of this region or in the host response to either P. falciparum or P. vivax infection outside pregnancy. These findings may hold significant clinical relevance to the pathophysiology and outcome of malaria infections in this region.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times