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Frequency of the Rendement Napole RN- allele in a population of American Hampshire pigs.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of animal science
Publication Date
Volume
78
Issue
7
Pages
1811–1815
Identifiers
PMID: 10907822
Source
Medline

Abstract

A total of 204 purebred Hampshire pigs were obtained from 23 breeders. These animals were the progeny of 41 sires and 123 dams. A sample of purebred Yorkshire (n = 24) pigs were also used in the study. Animals were classified by glycolytic potential determined on a live-animal longissimus muscle biopsy sample. Hampshire pigs (n = 176) with glycolytic potential greater than 185 micromol/g (x = 238.8 micromol/g; SD = 29.54) were classified as heterozygous or homozygous for the dominant RN- allele (RN-rn+ or RN-RN-, respectively), whereas cohorts (n = 28) with glycolytic potential less than 185 micromol/g (x = 141.3 micromol/g; SD = 24.48) were considered as homozygous normal (rn+rn+). All Yorkshire pigs (n = 24) had a mean glycolytic potential level of 146.1 micromol/g (SD = 20.18) and were considered as homozygous normal (rn+rn+). The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium yielded frequencies of .630 and .370 for the dominant RN- allele and normal rn+ alleles in the Hampshire population, respectively, and genotypic frequencies of .397 (RN-RN-), .466 (RN-rn+), and .137 (rn+rn+). Hampshires with glycolytic potential > or = 185 micromol/g had significantly lower longissimus muscle ultimate pH, intramuscular fat, subjective marbling scores, and percentage of protein (P < .001) and had greater longissimus muscle percentage of moisture (P < .001), drip loss (P < .01), and cooking loss (P < .001) than rn+rn+ Hampshires and Yorkshires. These data suggest the RN- allele exists at a high frequency within the American Hampshire breed. Higher glycolytic potential levels, which accompany the allele, may cause decreased meat quality.

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