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Formation of Vegetative Cover in Quarries after Forest Recultivation in the Middle Taiga Subzone of the Komi Republic

Authors
  • Likhanova, I. A.1
  • Kuznetsova, Ye. G.1
  • Novakovskiy, A. B.1
  • 1 Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Syktyvkar, 167982, Russia , Syktyvkar (Russia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Contemporary Problems of Ecology
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Dec 29, 2021
Volume
14
Issue
7
Pages
760–766
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1134/S199542552107012X
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Article
License
Yellow

Abstract

AbstractThe paper presents a study of characteristics of the formation of the vegetative cover after forest recultivation with the traditional technology (the planting of forest culture without any improvement of the technogenic substrate) on exhausted quarries of construction materials situated within the middle taiga subzone of the northeastern part of European Russia. It was found that forest recultivation helps decrease the time of forest stands formation by minimizing the lengthy initial period of tree introduction. On the 13th year of managed succession, the average height of pine trees was found to be 3 m, the canopy density was 0.2–0.3, and the crown density was 2.3–2.9. The substrate conditions affect the growth and overall preservation of the spruce, as well as the structure and texture of the ground vegetation. The biometric characteristics of pines on sandy loam quarries are better than those on sandy or loamy quarries. The grass communities are comprised of meadow and ruderal species, which are typical for the technogenic ecotopes of taiga zone. They are well-developed on loamy substrates but get scattered on sandy loam and sand substrates. The moss layer is well-developed on substrates with coarser textures. After the first 13 years of managed succession, the following features were observed: the formation of a vertical structure of the vegetative communities; the introduction of forest species into the ground vegetation, including the dominant species of the grass, shrub and moss layers of the natural pine forests; increases in species diversity and the projective cover, balancing of the communities' floristic structures, and primitive soil formation.

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