Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Forgetting common ground: six- to seven-year-olds have an overinterpretive theory of mind.

Authors
  • Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen
  • Sayfan, Liat
  • Blattman, Amanda J
Type
Published Article
Journal
Developmental psychology
Publication Date
Nov 01, 2010
Volume
46
Issue
6
Pages
1417–1432
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1037/a0021062
PMID: 21058831
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Four- to 9-year-olds and adults (N = 256) viewed a series of pictures that were covered with occluders to reveal nondescript or identifiable parts. Participants predicted how 3 characters, 1 who had previously viewed the full picture and 2 who had not, would interpret the obstructed drawings. Results showed significant development between 4 and 9 years and between 9 years and adulthood in understanding thought diversity as well as situations in which people should think alike. There was also evidence for a U-shaped developmental curve, with 6- to 7-year-olds most often overextending the rule that people will think differently, particularly on the initial testing trials. Performance on the different interpretive theory-of-mind measures was differentially related to individual differences in inhibitory control and verbal working memory.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times