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Forest Integrity at Anthropogenic Edges: Air Pollution Disrupts Bioindicators

Authors
  • Glenn, Marian G.1
  • Webb, Sara L.2
  • Cole, Mariette S.3
  • 1 Seton Hall University, Biology Department, South Orange, NJ, 07079 , South Orange
  • 2 Drew University, Biology Department, Madison, NJ, 07940 , Madison
  • 3 Concordia College, Biology Department, St. Paul, MN, 55104 , St. Paul
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jun 01, 1998
Volume
51
Issue
1-2
Pages
163–169
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1023/A:1005983118447
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

The response of corticolous lichens, bryophytes, and vascular plants to anthropogenic edges in northern hardwood forest preserves is compared in east-coast and mid-west (NW Minnesota) sites, using micro-epiphytes on red oak (Quercus rubra) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum). The drastically attenuated lichen flora in the east, apparently due to regional air pollution, restricts the usefulness of these bioindicators, even 120 km from New York City. The forest edge is not necessarily equated with increased light. Established edges may have pronounced shoot growth that shades epiphytes. In the absence of air pollution, lichen and bryophyte species exhibit individual responses to light, humidity, and substrate chemistry. Thus summary variables such as total cover or species richness have limited value as bioindicators of forest integrity.

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