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Forced exercise does not improve recovery after hemorrhagic stroke in rats.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Research
0006-8993
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Volume
1109
Issue
1
Pages
183–191
Identifiers
PMID: 16854389
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Exercise can improve recovery following ischemia and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in rodents. We tested whether forced exercise (EX; running wheel) prior to and/or following ICH in rats would reduce lesion volume and improve functional outcome (walking, skilled reaching, spontaneous paw usage) at 7 weeks post-ICH. A striatal hemorrhage was produced by infusing collagenase. First, we compared animals that received EX (2 weeks; 1 h/day) ending two days prior to ICH and/or starting two weeks following ICH. EX did not improve functional recovery or affect lesion size. Doubling the amount of EX given per day (two 1-h sessions) both prior to and following ICH did not alter lesion volume, but worsened recovery. We then determined if EX (1 h/day) prior to and following ICH would affect outcome after a somewhat milder insult. There were no differences between the groups in lesion volume or recovery. Finally, we used a hemoglobin assay at 12 h following ICH to determine if pre-stroke EX (2 weeks; 1 h/day) aggravated bleeding. It did not. These observations suggest that EX does not improve outcome when given prior to and/or when delayed following ICH. Effective rehabilitation for ICH will likely require more complex interventions than forced running.

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