Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Forced displacement: critical lessons in the protracted aftermath of a flood disaster.

Authors
  • Mucherera, Blessing1
  • Spiegel, Samuel2
  • 1 School of GeoSciences, The University of Edinburgh, Drummond St, Edinburgh, EH8 9XP UK.
  • 2 Centre of African Studies School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15a George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LD UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
GeoJournal
Publication Date
Jul 15, 2021
Pages
1–21
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10708-021-10471-w
PMID: 34305267
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Forced displacement and resettlement is a pervasive challenge being contemplated across the social sciences. Scholarly literature, however, often fails to engage complexities of power in understanding socio-environmental interactions in resettlement processes. Addressing Zimbabwe's Tokwe-Mukosi flood disaster resettlement, we explore hegemonic uses of state power during the pre- and post-flood induced resettlement processes. We examine how state power exercised through local government, financial, and security institutions impacts community vulnerabilities during forced resettlement processes, while furthering capitalist agendas, drawing insights from analysing narratives between 2010 and 2021. Concerns abound that multiple ministries, the police, and the army undermined displaced people's resilience, including through inadequate compensation, with state institutions neglecting displaced communities during encampment by inadequately meeting physical security, health, educational, and livestock production needs. We explore how forcibly resettling encamped households to a disputed location is not only an ongoing perceived injustice regionally but also a continuing reference point in resettlement discussions countrywide, reflecting concerns that land use and economic reconfigurations in resettlement can undermine subsistence livelihoods while privileging certain values and interests over others. Policy lessons highlight the need for reviewing disaster management legislation, developing compensation guidelines and reviewing encampment practices. Analytically, lessons point to how state power may be studied in relation to perspectives on the destruction of flood survivors' connections to place, people and livelihoods, underscoring the critical need for theorising the relationships between power dynamics and diverse experiences around displacement. © The Author(s) 2021.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times