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Foraging costs drive within-colony spatial segregation in shearwaters from two contrasting environments in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Authors
  • Pereira, Jorge M1, 2
  • Ramos, Jaime A3
  • Almeida, Nathalie3, 4
  • Araújo, Pedro M3, 5
  • Ceia, Filipe R3
  • Geraldes, Pedro6
  • Marques, Ana M3
  • Matos, Diana M3
  • Rodrigues, Isabel3, 4
  • Dos Santos, Ivo3
  • Paiva, Vitor H3
  • 1 Department of Life Sciences, MARE-Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, University of Coimbra, Calçada Martim de Freitas, 3000-456, Coimbra, Portugal. [email protected] , (Portugal)
  • 2 Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Penryn, Cornwall, TR10 9FE, UK. [email protected]
  • 3 Department of Life Sciences, MARE-Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, University of Coimbra, Calçada Martim de Freitas, 3000-456, Coimbra, Portugal. , (Portugal)
  • 4 Biosfera Cabo Verde, Rua de Moçambique 28, Mindelo, Caixa Postal 233, São Vicente, Cabo Verde.
  • 5 CIBIO/InBIO, Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos, Campus Agrário de Vairão, Universidade do Porto, 4485-661, Vairão, Portugal. , (Portugal)
  • 6 SPEA-Sociedade Portuguesa para o Estudo das Aves, Av. Columbano Bordalo Pinheiro, 87, 3º Andar, 1070-062, Lisbon, Portugal. , (Portugal)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Oecologia
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
May 01, 2022
Volume
199
Issue
1
Pages
13–26
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00442-022-05109-8
PMID: 35044501
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Foraging spatial segregation is frequent in central-place foragers during the breeding season, but very few studies have investigated foraging spatial segregation between adjacent sub-colonies. Here, we assessed for within-colony differences in the at-sea distribution, habitat use, trophic ecology and chick growth data of two Calonectris colonies differing in size, and breeding in two different environments in the North Atlantic Ocean. For this, we GPS tracked 52 Cory's shearwaters (Calonectris borealis) breeding in 2 small sub-colonies at Berlenga Island (Portugal) and 59 Cape Verde shearwaters (Calonectris edwardsii) breeding in 2 sub-colonies differing greatly in size at Raso Islet (Cabo Verde), over 2 consecutive breeding seasons (2017-2018), during chick-rearing. Cory's shearwaters from the two sub-colonies at Berlenga Island broadly overlapped in repeatedly used foraging patches close to the colony. In contrast, the foraging distribution of Cape Verde shearwaters was partially segregated in the colony surroundings, but overlapped at distant foraging areas off the west coast of Africa. Despite spatial segregation close to the colony, Cape Verde shearwaters from both sub-colonies departed in similar directions, foraged in similar habitats and exhibited mostly short trips within the archipelago of Cabo Verde. These results, corroborated with similar trophic ecology and chick growth rates between sub-colonies, support the idea that foraging spatial segregation in the colony surroundings was not likely driven by interference competition or directional bias. We suggest that high-quality prey patches are able to shape travel costs and foraging distribution of central-place foragers from neighbouring sub-colonies. © 2022. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

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