Affordable Access

Footedness in binocular and monocular chicks.

Authors
  • Tommasi, L
  • Vallortigara, G
Type
Published Article
Journal
Laterality
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1999
Volume
4
Issue
1
Pages
89–95
Identifiers
PMID: 15513107
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The first foot used during bouts of ground scratching in 16-day-old chicks searching for food in the floor of an arena covered with sawdust was recorded in animals with normal binocular vision and in animals with an eye temporarily occluded by an eye-patch. Binocular chicks showed a significant right foot bias, whereas monocular chicks tended to use the foot contralateral to the eye in use. Data for monocular chicks thus suggest that the activated hemisphere (contralateral to the eye in use) is the one that takes control of posture, leaving to the other hemisphere reflex-like responses associated with ground scratching or body wiping. It is argued that footedness in chicks might have arisen from the limb that is used to maintain postural and positional control, rather than from the limb that is used during motor activities.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times