Affordable Access

Food advertising and television exposure: influence on eating behavior and nutritional status of children and adolescents.

Authors
  • Costa, Suzane Mota Marques
  • Horta, Paula Martins
  • dos Santos, Luana Caroline
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archivos latinoamericanos de nutrición
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2012
Volume
62
Issue
1
Pages
53–59
Identifiers
PMID: 23477208
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate the influence of food advertising and television exposure on eating behaviour and nutritional status of children and adolescents. It was a cross sectional study developed among 116 students from a private school in Brazil. Socio-demographic and health conditions were evaluated. Anthropometric data, food consumption, physical activity, television viewing habits and behaviour in relation to food advertising were also investigated. Among the results, a 1:2 relationship was identified between the number of televisions and residents per household. Excessive weight was present in 25.8% of subjects and 66.4% of children watched television while eating. Children were exposed to television for a median of 3.0 hours daily (95% CI: 2.9 to 3.6). There was a direct association between attraction to foods advertised and purchasing the product (p < 0.001) and a positive relationship between the number of televisions per household and body weight (r = 0.246, p = 0.015) and the amount of liquid consumed during meals (r = 0.277, p = 0.013). Findings also highlighted the association between watching television while eating and the reduced probability of fruit consumption (p = 0.032), contrasted with a greater likelihood of daily artificial juice intake (p = 0.039). In conclusion, watching television is associated with lower probability of daily consumption of fruits and the number of television at household is positively related to BMI in children and adolescents.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times