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Food advertisements on television and eating habits in adolescents: a school-based study.

Authors
  • Delfino, Leandro Dragueta1
  • Tebar, William Rodrigues1
  • Silva, Diego Augusto Santos2
  • Gil, Fernanda Caroline Staquecini3
  • Mota, Jorge4
  • Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro5
  • 1 Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências da Motricidade, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Presidente Prudente, SP, Brasil.
  • 2 Departamento de Educação Física, Centro de Desportos, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brasil.
  • 3 Programa de Pós-graduação em Fisioterapia, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Presidente Prudente, SP, Brasil.
  • 4 Centro de Investigação em Actividade Física, Saúde e Lazer, Faculdade de Desporto, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal. , (Portugal)
  • 5 Departamento de Educação Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Presidente Prudente, SP, Brasil.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Revista de Saúde Pública
Publisher
Universidade de Sao Paulo Sistema Integrado de Bibliotecas - SIBiUSP
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
54
Pages
55–55
Identifiers
DOI: 10.11606/s1518-8787.2020054001558
PMID: 32491114
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To analyze the association of television food advertisements with eating habits in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS The sample was composed of 1,011 adolescents, aged from 10-17 years. The influence of television food advertisements on eating habits, as well as food consumption and socioeconomic variables were assessed through questionnaires. A binary logistic regression was performed to assess the magnitude of the associations, adjusted for gender, age, socioeconomic status, and parental schooling. RESULTS Of the sample, 83.3% (n = 843) reported food consumption while watching TV. Adolescents who do not consume food while watching TV had a higher weekly consumption of fruits (3.98, SD = 2.0 versus 3.39, SD = 2.1) and vegetables (4.1, SD = 2.2 versus 3.4, SD = 2.3). Adolescents that consume food while watching TV had higher weekly consumption of fried foods (3.1, SD = 2.0 versus 2.3, SD = 1.7), sweets (4.1, SD = 2.1 versus 3.3, SD = 2.1), soft drinks (3.2, SD = 2.1 versus 2.2, SD = 1.9), and snacks (2.3, SD = 2.0 versus 1.6, SD = 1.7). For 73,8% of the sample, food advertisements induce product consumerism, most commonly sweets and fast foods. Buying or asking to buy food after seeing it on the television was associated with fried foods (OR = 1.36, 95%CI = 1.03- 1.79), sweets (OR = 1.69, 95%CI = 1.30-2.18), and snacks (OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.12-2.22). CONCLUSION Food advertisements were associated with greater consumption of fried foods, sweets, and snacks in adolescents, even after adjusting for confounding factors.

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