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fMRI BOLD Signal Changes in Elite Swimmers While Viewing Videos of Personal Failure

Authors
  • Davis IV, Henry1
  • Liotti, Mario2
  • Ngan, Elton T.3
  • Woodward, Todd S.3
  • Van Snellenberg, Jared X.4
  • van Anders, Sari M.5
  • Smith, Aynsley6
  • Mayberg, Helen S.7
  • 1 Swimming Canada, Suite 354, 401- 9th Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2P 3C5, Canada , Calgary (Canada)
  • 2 Simon Fraser University, Department of Psychology, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada , Burnaby (Canada)
  • 3 University of British Columbia, Schizophrenia Cognition and Imaging Lab,Department of Psychiatry, 2C1-2255 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A1, Canada , Vancouver (Canada)
  • 4 Columbia University, Department of Psychology, 1190 Amsterdam Ave., New York, NY, 10027, USA , New York (United States)
  • 5 Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, 1101 East Tenth Street, Bloomington, IN, 47405, USA , Bloomington (United States)
  • 6 Sport Medicine Clinic, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA , Rochester (United States)
  • 7 Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA , Atlanta (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Brain Imaging and Behavior
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Jan 17, 2008
Volume
2
Issue
2
Pages
84–93
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11682-007-9016-x
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

Athletes who fail are susceptible to negative affect (NA) and impaired future performance. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified prefrontal, anterior cingulate, and limbic activations following negative mood provocation. Little is known about the neural correlates of negative self-reference (SR), especially in athletes. Even less is known about the neural correlates of the effects of cognitive intervention (CI) in modifying negative SR and NA in this population. In an fMRI study, 13 athletes watched a video of their own career-threatening defeat in two controlled blocks. Between fMRI blocks, they received a 20-min CI designed to assist in event reappraisal and planning for future performance. Relative increases post-CI were seen in premotor (BA6) and sensorimotor (BA4/1) cortices. Correlated with mood ratings, relatively higher pre-CI levels were seen in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (PFC; BA10), the right dorsolateral PFC (BA45), the anterior cingulate, and the right parahippocampus. CI may counteract the detrimental effects of NA and negative SR on premotor and motor activity.

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