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Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion.

Authors
  • Del Razo, Mauricio J
  • Pan, Wenxiao
  • Qian, Hong
  • Lin, Guang
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Physical Chemistry B
Publisher
American Chemical Society
Publication Date
Jun 26, 2014
Volume
118
Issue
25
Pages
7037–7046
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1021/jp5030125
PMID: 24877790
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The currently existing theory of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is based on the linear fluctuation theory originally developed by Einstein, Onsager, Lax, and others as a phenomenological approach to equilibrium fluctuations in bulk solutions. For mesoscopic reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear chemical reactions among a small number of molecules, a situation often encountered in single-cell biochemistry, it is expected that FCS time correlation functions of a reaction-diffusion system can deviate from the classic results of Elson and Magde [ Biopolymers 1974, 13, 1 - 27]. We first discuss this nonlinear effect for reaction systems without diffusion. For nonlinear stochastic reaction-diffusion systems, there are no closed solutions; therefore, stochastic Monte Carlo simulations are carried out. We show that the deviation is small for a simple bimolecular reaction; the most significant deviations occur when the number of molecules is small and of the same order. Our results show that current linear FCS theory could be adequate for measurements on biological systems that contain many other sources of uncertainties. At the same time, it provides a framework for future measurements of nonlinear, fluctuating chemical reactions with high-precision FCS. Extending Delbrück-Gillespie's theory for stochastic nonlinear reactions with rapid stirring to reaction-diffusion systems provides a mesoscopic model for chemical and biochemical reactions at nanometric and mesoscopic levels, such as a single biological cell.

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