Affordable Access

FLAVINE ADENINE DINUCLEOTIDE-LINKED MALIC DEHYDROGENASE FROM ACETOBACTER XYLINUM

Authors
  • Moshe Benziman
  • Y. Galanter
Publication Date
Oct 01, 1964
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Biology
License
Unknown

Abstract

Benziman, Moshe (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel), and Y. Galanter. Flavine adenine dinucleotide-linked malic dehydrogenase from Acetobacter xylinum. J. Bacteriol. 88:1010–1018. 1964.—The properties of the pyridine nucleotide-nonlinked malic dehydrogenase of Acetobacter xylinum were investigated in the supernatant fluid obtained by high-speed centrifugation of sonic extracts. Ferricyanide, phenazine methosulfate, and to a lesser extent dichlorophenolindophenol were active as oxidants for malate oxidation. After acid ammonium sulfate precipitation, the enzyme lost its malate-oxidizing activity. The enzyme was reactivated by low concentrations of flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) but not by flavine mononucleotide (FMN) or riboflavine. Atabrine inhibited the enzyme, and the inhibition was relieved by FAD but not by FMN or riboflavine. Malate-oxidizing activity was inhibited by hematin. The inhibition was prevented by imidazole or globin. o-Phenanthroline, 8-hydroxy quinoline, α,α'-dipyridyl, and p-chloromercuribenzoate inhibited malate oxidation. Amytal markedly inhibited oxidation of malate in the presence of oxygen, phenazine methosulfate, or dichlorophenolindophenol, but not in the presence of ferricyanide. The results suggest that the malic dehydrogenase of A. xylinum is a FAD enzyme, which contains an ironbinding site essential for its activity. Nonheme iron and sulfhydro groups are possibly involved in enzyme activity. The malic dehydrogenase is functionally linked to the cytochrome chain.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times