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Five stages in a practical population policy.

Authors
  • Taylor, C E
Type
Published Article
Journal
International development review
Publication Date
Dec 01, 1968
Volume
10
Issue
4
Pages
2–7
Identifiers
PMID: 12332020
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

A systematic approach to population planning is presented. This should help to provide a basis for decision-making about emphases and priorities. The greatest force for change is the increasing world population. The sharpest controversy is between proponents of family planning, who try to make it possible for parents to have the number of children they want, and proponents of population control, who try to modify the environment so parents will want fewer children. The five developmental stages in the organization of programs are: 1) to meet the existing demand and tell women where to go for birth limitation help; 2) to provide good quality technical service, organization, and follow-up because satisfied users are the best recruiters while unsatisfied persons can produce unfavorable rumors; 3) to improve family planning motivation by caring for the health of mothers and children particularly when high infant mortality must be corrected, (the post-partum period is thought to be the best time to educate mothers); 4) to alter the family's view of its economic prospects and its understanding of financial implications of more children, particularly in underdeveloped countries; 5) to modify socio-cultural factors, such as delayed age at marriage, more education of women, and general discussions of traditional beliefs. Population policy requires long-range planning with phased action.

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