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A First Experience of Space Radiation Monitoring in the Multi-Satellite Experiment of Moscow University in the Framework of the Universat-SOCRAT Project

Authors
  • Bogomolov, V. V.1, 2
  • Bogomolov, A. V.1
  • Dement’ev, Yu. N.1
  • Eremeev, V. E.1
  • Zaiko, Yu. K.1
  • Kalegaev, V. V.1
  • Klimov, P. A.1
  • Osedlo, V. I.1
  • Panasyuk, M. I.1, 2
  • Petrov, V. L.1
  • Peretjat’ko, O. Yu.1
  • Podzolko, M. V.1
  • Svertilov, S. I.1, 2
  • 1 Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
  • 2 Department of Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991, Russia , Moscow (Russia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Moscow University Physics Bulletin
Publisher
Pleiades Publishing
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2020
Volume
75
Issue
6
Pages
676–683
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3103/S0027134920060089
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

AbstractThe Moscow University Universat-SOCRAT program is aimed at using small satellites to monitor space threats, such as radiation in near-earth space, electromagnetic transients, and potentially dangerous bodies of natural and artificial origins. The first stage of the program implementation began on July 5, 2019 as a result of the successful launch of three Cubesat-type nanosatellites from the Vostochny cosmodrome. These satellites are equipped with instruments for space radiation monitoring, as well as prototypes of devices for observing transient phenomena in the Earth’s atmosphere. In particular, two satellites are equipped with scintillation phosphich detectors that detect charged particles and gamma quanta in the energy release range of 0.1–2 MeV. The geometric factor of these instruments is \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\approx}50$$\end{document} cm\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${}^{2}$$\end{document} sr. One of the Cubesats also carries an optical photometer, consisting of four silicon photomultipliers, which entrance windows are covered with different light filters. The satellites were launched into solar-synchronous orbits with an altitude of \documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\approx}550$$\end{document} km. This makes favorable conditions for space radiation monitoring in various areas of near-Earth space, including zones of trapped radiation, areas of precipitation, etc. Such an orbit also allows observations of flare phenomena both in the equatorial atmosphere and at high latitudes. The first results of flight tests are discussed.

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