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First Blindness Cases of Horses Infected with Setaria Digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in the Republic of Korea.

Authors
  • Shin, Jihun1
  • Ahn, Kyu-Sung1
  • Suh, Guk-Hyun2
  • Kim, Ha-Jung2
  • Jeong, Hak-Sub3
  • Kim, Byung-Su4
  • Choi, Eunsang5
  • Shin, Sung-Shik1
  • 1 Department of Parasitology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Bongsun Veterinary Clinic, Gwangju 61671, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 4 YeongGwang Veterinary Clinic, Jeollanam-do 57043, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 5 Smile Animal Clinic, Busan 46745, Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Korean journal of parasitology
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
55
Issue
6
Pages
667–671
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3347/kjp.2017.55.6.667
PMID: 29320823
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Ocular setariases of cattle were reported but those of equine hosts have never been reported in the Republic of Korea (Korea). We found motile worms in the aqueous humor of 15 horses (Equus spp.) from 12 localities in southern parts of Korea between January 2004 and November 2017. After the affected animals were properly restrained under sedation and local anesthesia, 10 ml disposable syringe with a 16-gauge needle was inserted into the anterior chamber of the affected eye to successfully remove the parasites. The male worm that was found in 7 of the cases showed a pair of lateral appendages near the posterior terminal end of the body. The papillar arrangement was 3 pairs of precloacal, a pair of adcloacal, and 3 pairs of postcloacal papillae, plus a central papilla just in front of the cloaca. The female worms found in the eyes of 8 horses were characterized by the tapering posterior terminal end of the body with a smooth knob. Worms were all identified as Setaria digitata (von Linstow, 1906) by the morphologic characteristics using light and electron microscopic observations. This is the first blindness cases of 15 horses infected with S. digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea) in Korea.

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