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The first Australian plant foods at Madjedbebe, 65,000–53,000 years ago

Authors
  • Florin, S. Anna1
  • Fairbairn, Andrew S.1, 2, 3
  • Nango, May4
  • Djandjomerr, Djaykuk4
  • Marwick, Ben5
  • Fullagar, Richard2
  • Smith, Mike6, 7
  • Wallis, Lynley A.8, 9
  • Clarkson, Chris1, 2, 3
  • 1 University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia , Brisbane (Australia)
  • 2 University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia , Wollongong (Australia)
  • 3 Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Kahlaiche Strasse 10, Jena, 07745, Germany , Jena (Germany)
  • 4 Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation, 5 Gregory Place, Jabiru, NT, 0886, Australia , Jabiru (Australia)
  • 5 University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA , Seattle (United States)
  • 6 Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, 5042, Australia , Adelaide (Australia)
  • 7 National Museum of Australia, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia , Canberra (Australia)
  • 8 University of Notre Dame Australia, Broome, WA, 6725, Australia , Broome (Australia)
  • 9 Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD, 4111, Australia , Brisbane (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nature Communications
Publisher
Springer Nature
Publication Date
Feb 17, 2020
Volume
11
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-14723-0
Source
Springer Nature
License
Green

Abstract

Little is known about the diets of early modern humans as they dispersed into Australia. Here, Florin et al. study charred plant remains from Madjedbebe rockshelter, which show that 65–53 thousand years ago, early modern humans in northern Australia already had a broad diet of plants.

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