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Financial stress among skin cancer patients: a cross-sectional review of the 2013-2018 National Health Interview Survey.

Authors
  • Cwalina, Thomas B1, 2
  • Jella, Tarun K3, 4
  • Tripathi, Raghav3, 4, 5
  • Carroll, Bryan T3, 4
  • 1 Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA. [email protected].
  • 2 Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 11100 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA. [email protected].
  • 3 Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA.
  • 4 Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 11100 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA.
  • 5 The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Archives of Dermatological Research
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
May 01, 2023
Volume
315
Issue
4
Pages
1003–1010
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s00403-022-02330-6
PMID: 35192005
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Financial stress among skin cancer patients may limit treatment efficacy by forcing the postponement of care or decreasing adherence to dermatologist recommendations. Limited information is available quantifying the anxiety experienced by skin cancer patients from both healthcare and non-healthcare factors. Therefore, the present study sought to perform a retrospective cross-sectional review of the 2013-2018 cycles of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) to determine the prevalence, at-risk groups, and predictive factors of skin cancer patient financial stress. Survey responses estimated that 11.45% (95% Cl 10.02-12.88%) of skin cancer patients experience problems paying medical bills, 20.34% (95% Cl 18.97-21.71%) of patients worry about the medical costs, 13.73% (95% Cl 12.55-14.91%) of patients worry about housing costs, and 37.48% (95% Cl 35.83-39.14%) of patients worry about money for retirement. Focusing on at-risk groups, black patients, uninsured patients, and patients with low incomes (< 200% poverty level) consistently experienced high rates of financial stress for each of the four measures. Multivariable logistic regression revealed low education, lack of insurance, and low income to be predictive of financial stress. These findings suggest that a considerable proportion of skin cancer patients experience financial stress related to both healthcare and non-healthcare factors. Where possible, the additional intricacy of treating patients at risk of high financial stress may be considered to optimize patient experience and outcomes. © 2022. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

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