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Field evaluation of organic and synthetic insecticides against the hala scale, Thysanococcus pandani (Hemiptera: Halimococcidae), on Maui, Hawaii.

Authors
  • Russo, Mason1
  • Waisen, Philip1
  • Lutgen, Hannah2
  • Cheng, Zhiqiang1
  • 1 Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA.
  • 2 Cooperative Extension, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96732, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of economic entomology
Publication Date
Dec 11, 2023
Volume
116
Issue
6
Pages
2070–2075
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/jee/toad184
PMID: 37793043
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The hala scale, Thysanococcus pandani Stickney, is an invasive insect that infests hala trees, Pandanus tectorius, and has recently arrived in the Hawaiian Islands of Maui, Oahu, and Molokai. Hala scale is native to Thailand, Indonesia, and Singapore and was accidentally introduced to Maui, with its first detection in Hana in 1995. The hala tree is a frequently planted ornamental plant throughout Hawaii's urban landscape and is also a native tree found in coastal areas of ecological suitability throughout the state. These trees are integral to native Hawaiian weaving traditions, as the leaves were used to make items such as sails, hats, or mats. The spread of T. pandani threatens the continuation of these practices, as the plant material may not be sufficient for weaving. Hala trees infested with T. pandani can have negative effects such as deformation, discoloration, and early tree death. Experimental field trials were set up to evaluate the efficacy of organic and chemical insecticides as potential treatments to mitigate the damage of T. pandani infestations. This was done on the Island of Maui, where T. pandani is widespread. These trees were artificially inoculated with T. pandani and evaluated throughout the trials for changes in plant height, canopy width, scale removal, and visual infestation ratings. The results of 2 repeated field trials indicated that flupyradifurone and buprofezin were effective treatments in the reduction of the hala scale infestation and improving visual aspects related to plant health. © The Author(s) 2023. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: [email protected].

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