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Femoral anastomotic aneurysms.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of Surgery
0003-4932
Publisher
Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer) - Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Publication Date
Volume
191
Issue
6
Pages
715–720
Identifiers
PMID: 7387233
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Both the literature and this experience support host vessel degeneration as the primary etiologic factor in femoral anastomotic aneurysms. Associated factors that produce increased "intra-anastomotic tension," such as hypertension, superficial femoral artery occlusion, and flow turbulence, appear to contribute to vessel deterioration. Other factors, much less prevalent in present-day vascular surgery, such as rigid grafts, deficient suture material, inappropriate angle of incidence, and excessive tension on the graft can contribute to anstomotic disruption. Certain guidelines may be helpful in the management of femoral pseudoaneurysm. 1) Redo the entire anstomosis, rather than simply resuturing a disrupted edge. 2) Use minimal dissection to avoid injury to outflow vessels and to limit disruption of supportive tissue. 3) Use braided synthetic suture material. 4) Avoid tension by interposing a segment of graft between the proximal graft limb and the host vessel. 5) Use knitted Dacron for the interposed segment so the new anastomosis to the host vessel will be with softer, more pliable fabric. 6) Assure smooth adequate outflow by end-to-end anastomosis with a patch angioplasty or distal bypass. These guidelines should lead to a safe, reliable solution to one of the vexing complications of aortofemoral bypass procedure.

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