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Features of the social and built environment that contribute to the well-being of people with dementia who live at home: A scoping review.

Authors
  • Sturge, Jodi1
  • Nordin, Susanna2
  • Sussana Patil, Divya3
  • Jones, Allyson4
  • Légaré, France5
  • Elf, Marie2
  • Meijering, Louise6
  • 1 Population Research Centre, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Netherlands. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Netherlands)
  • 2 School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. , (Sweden)
  • 3 Transdisciplinary Centre for Qualitative Methods, Department of Health Information, Prasanna School of Public Health (PSPH), Manipal Academy of Higher Education (MAHE), Manipal, India. , (India)
  • 4 Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 Centre De Recherche Sur Les soins et Les Services de Première Ligne de S'Université Laval (CERSSPL-UL), Department of Family Medicine and Emergency Medicine, Université Laval, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 6 Population Research Centre, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Health & place
Publication Date
Nov 27, 2020
Volume
67
Pages
102483–102483
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.healthplace.2020.102483
PMID: 33254054
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This scoping review summarizes findings from 23 qualitative articles on how social and built environments contribute to the well-being of people with dementia who live at home. Through thematic analysis, two themes were identified: i) connection to society and supportive relationships and ii) interaction with natural environments and public space. Features of the social and built environment contribute to well-being both positively and negatively. Future research should explore how these features intersect in an urban-rural context as a basis to inform the development of dementia-friendly initiatives. Moreover, involving people with dementia in the design of features of built environments, such as infrastructure, will result in more inclusive communities. Copyright © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

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