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Mass Secondary Schooling and the State: The Role of State Compulsion in the High School Movement

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  • Education

Abstract

Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy This PDF is a selection from a published volume from the National Bureau of Economic Research Volume Title: Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy Volume Author/Editor: Dora L. Costa and Naomi R. Lamoreaux Volume Publisher: University of Chicago Press Volume ISBN: 0-226-11634-4 Volume URL: http://www.nber.org/books/cost10-1 Conference Date: November 7-8, 2008 Publication Date: August 2011 Chapter Title: Mass Secondary Schooling and the State: The Role of State Compulsion in the High School Movement Chapter Author: Claudia Goldin, Lawrence F. Katz Chapter URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c12002 Chapter pages in book: (p. 275 - 310) 275 From 1910 to 1940, a period known in U.S. educational history as the high school movement, the fraction of youths enrolled in public and private U.S. secondary schools increased from 18 to 71 percent. The fraction graduat- ing nationwide soared from 9 to 51 percent (see fi gure 9.1) and the increase was even greater in most northern and western states (see fi gure 9.2 for U.S. regional data). Such increases are as large as those achieved in the recent histories of nations undergoing the most rapid of transitions to mass sec- ondary schooling. In South Korea, for example, the fraction graduating from upper secondary school increased from 25 percent to 88 percent in the three decades from 1954 to 1984.1 9 Mass Secondary Schooling and the State The Role of State Compulsion in the High School Movement Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz Claudia Goldin is the Henry Lee Professor of Economics at Harvard University and director of the Development of the American Economy program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Lawrence F. Katz is the Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics at Harvard Uni- versity and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research

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