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Implications of subtalar joint motion for muscle and joint loading during running

Authors
Journal
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
1757-1146
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
Volume
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/1757-1146-5-s1-o45
Keywords
  • Oral Presentation
Disciplines
  • Mathematics
  • Physics

Abstract

Implications of subtalar joint motion for muscle and joint loading during running ORAL PRESENTATION Open Access Implications of subtalar joint motion for muscle and joint loading during running Uwe G Kersting From 3rd Congress of the International Foot and Ankle Biomechanics Community Sydney, Australia. 11-13 April 2012 Background Rearfoot pronation is one of the factors having been linked to overuse injuries in running (1). Many studies have used shoe eversion as a measure for movement about the subtalar joint axis. Others used foot move- ment expressed as rotations about the anatomical main axes (2). If joint coupling and with that muscle loading is to be investigated it may be beneficial to assess rota- tions about the anatomical axes, namely the talocrural and subtalar joints. The aim of this study was to describe how the rela- tionship of the two ankle joint movements is affected by moderate geometric changes of the midsole of a running shoe. Secondly, the relationship of total ankle movement in main anatomical planes and the two anatomical ankle joints was to be explored. Materials and methods Eleven experienced runners were asked to run in a run- ning shoe (Nike Pegasus) with neutral (NE), +4° varus (VR) and –4° valgus (VG) midsole. Subjects were given 1 – 2 km of running to accommodate. Three-dimen- sional kinematics were recorded using an eight-camera system (Motion Analysis Corp., Eva, 120 Hz). Ground reaction forces were sampled at 1200 Hz from 2 force plates (Bertec). A lower extremity model was scaled to each individual and inverse dynamics analysis carried out in the Any Body Modelling System (3). Subtalar and talocrural joint kinematics, joint kinetics and muscle activations were extracted after optimisation. Additionally, foot rotations with respect to the leg segment in the cardinal anatomi- cal planes were extracted for comparison. Regression techniques were employed to test for relationships of kinematics and muscle activations (p<.05). Results Sagitt

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