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Favorable balance of prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 improves early patency of human in situ vein grafts.

Authors
  • Bush, H L Jr
  • Graber, J N
  • Jakubowski, J A
  • Hong, S L
  • McCabe, M
  • Deykin, D
  • Nabseth, D C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Vascular Surgery
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1984
Volume
1
Issue
1
Pages
149–159
Identifiers
PMID: 6384557
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Graft thrombosis soon after reconstruction remains a major obstacle to the use of reversed vein grafts in infrapopliteal reconstruction. Our clinical experience with in situ vein grafts corroborates Leather's results by demonstrating an overall graft patency of 95% below the knee at 1 year and 94% in the infrapopliteal group. It has been postulated that this improved early patency rate of in situ vein grafts is the result of more optimal preservation of the endothelium of the vein graft. To investigate this hypothesis, human saphenous veins were handled by an in situ and a reversed technique. The intact vein segments were then tested for luminal production of prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 and fixed for scanning electron microscopic analysis of the surface morphology. This study demonstrated that endothelial cell prostacyclin release is enhanced in human in situ vein segments but not in reversed vein segments. In addition, luminal production of thromboxane A2 is significantly greater in the reversed than in the in situ vein segments. These findings are associated with marked endothelial structural damage in the reversed veins and minimal endothelial disruption in the in situ veins. Therefore the ratio of the antiaggregatory vasodilator prostacyclin to the proaggregatory vasoconstrictor thromboxane A2 is significantly more favorable for the in situ vein segment than for the reversed vein segment. The observed excellent early patency of the in situ vein grafts in our poor-risk patient population may in part be the result of this favorable balance of prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 and the more optimally preserved endothelial morphology.

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