Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Fatigue severity and electronic cigarette beliefs and use behavior.

Authors
  • Zvolensky, Michael J1
  • Manning, Kara2
  • Garey, Lorra2
  • Mayorga, Nubia A2
  • Peraza, Natalia2
  • 1 Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA; Department of Behavioral Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; HEALTH Institute, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Addictive behaviors
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2019
Volume
97
Pages
1–6
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2019.05.014
PMID: 31108412
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use has risen dramatically in the United States. Clinically significant fatigue may represent one previously unexplored individual difference factor related to e-cigarette use patterns and e-cigarette specific cognitive processes. Fatigue reflects the experience of being tired, lacking energy, and feeling exhausted. Although fatigue is a normal bodily response, severe or chronic fatigue is maladaptive. Thus, the current study sought to evaluate clinically significant fatigue and its relation to perceived barriers for quitting e-cigarettes, perceived risks and perceived benefits of e-cigarette use, and e-cigarette dependence among 625 adult e-cigarette smokers (51.8% female, Mage = 34.91 years, SD = 10.29). Results indicated that severe fatigue was significantly related to greater perceived barriers to quitting (p < .001), perceived risks (p < .001) and perceived benefits (p < .001) of e-cigarette use, and greater e-cigarette dependence (p < .001); effects that were evident after adjusting for a range of other factors (e.g., combustible cigarette use, pain severity). These novel empirical results highlight the severity of fatigue as a potentially important construct in efforts to better understand beliefs related to e-cigarette use and e-cigarette dependence. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times