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Family structure as a predictor of screen time among youth.

Authors
  • McMillan, Rachel
  • McIsaac, Michael
  • Janssen, Ian
Type
Published Article
Journal
PeerJ
Publisher
PeerJ
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2015
Volume
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.7717/peerj.1048
PMID: 26137429
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The family plays a central role in the development of health-related behaviors among youth. The objective of this study was to determine whether non-traditional parental structure and shared custody arrangements predict how much time youth spend watching television, using a computer recreationally, and playing video games. Participants were a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth (N = 26,068) in grades 6-10 who participated in the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey. Screen time in youth from single parent and reconstituted families, with or without regular visitation with their non-residential parent, was compared to that of youth from traditional dual-parent families. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. After multiple imputation, the relative odds of being in the highest television, computer use, video game, and total screen time quartiles were not different in boys and girls from non-traditional families by comparison to boys and girls from traditional dual-parent families. In conclusion, parental structure and child custody arrangements did not have a meaningful impact on screen time among youth.

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