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Family caregiving in dementia: prediction of caregiver burden 12 months after relocation to group-living care.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
International psychogeriatrics / IPA
Publication Date
Volume
10
Issue
2
Pages
127–146
Identifiers
PMID: 9677500
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The strain of caregiving associated with the care of demented persons living at home often continues after relocation and group-living care units (GL), designed for a small number of subjects, have been developed. The aim was to prospectively describe caregiver burden in relationship to symptoms of patients with dementia after relocation to GL. Sixty-four caregivers and 64 demented patients were assessed before, 6 months after, and 12 months after relocation. Thirty-six caregivers were children, 7 were spouses, and 21 were others. Validated scales were used for caregiver burden and dementia symptoms. Total burden of caregivers decreased after 12 months, but the degree of isolation was unchanged and feeling of disappointment increased significantly. The burden was not related to changes of activities of daily life or disorientation. Patients' lack of vitality at relocation independently predicted caregiver's burden 1 year later. Hallucinations and changes of symptoms during the first year associated with less caregiver burden, probably due to greater detachment of the relationship. The caregiver burden remains 1 year after relocation and any support to the caregiver should consider patients' symptoms, especially lack of vitality.

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