Affordable Access

Access to the full text

FADS Genetic Variants in Taiwanese Modify Association of DHA Intake and Its Proportions in Human Milk

Authors
  • Wu, Wen-Chieh
  • Lin, Hung-Chih1, 2, 3
  • Liao, Wen-Ling4
  • Tsai, Yueh-Ying
  • Chen, An-Chyi5
  • Chen, Hsiang-Chun
  • Lin, Hsiang-Yu1, 5
  • Liao, Li-Na6
  • Chao, Pei-Min7
  • 1 (H.-Y.L.)
  • 2 Asia University Hospital, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan
  • 3 School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
  • 4 Center for Personalized Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan
  • 5 College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
  • 6 Department of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
  • 7 Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrients
Publisher
MDPI AG
Publication Date
Feb 20, 2020
Volume
12
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3390/nu12020543
PMID: 32093185
PMCID: PMC7071481
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Our objective was to determine how docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) proportions in human milk are modulated by maternal FADS gene variants and dietary intake in Taiwanese women. Inclusion criteria included being healthy, 20–40 y old, having had a full-term baby that they intended to breast feed for at least 1 month, and willingness to participate in this study. Intake of DHA was assessed by food frequency questionnaire and fatty acids were analyzed in human milk samples collected 3–4 weeks postpartum. Based on multiple linear regression of data from 164 mothers that completed this study, there was 0.28% (FA%) reduction in milk DHA in high versus low genetic risk (stratified by whether minor allele numbers were ≥ 3 in rs1535 and rs174448) and 0.45% reduction in low versus high intake (stratified by whether DHA intake reached 200 mg/d). There was a significant gene–diet interaction; mothers with low genetic risk only had high milk DHA proportions with high DHA intake, whereas for mothers with high genetic risk, dietary effects were quite limited. Therefore, for FADS single nucleotide polymorphism in Taiwanese women, increasing DHA intake did not correct low milk DHA proportions in those with a high-risk genotype. Diet only conferred benefits to those with a low-risk genotype. Trial registration: This trial was retrospectively registered (Feb 12, 2019) in ClinicalTrials.gov (No. NCT03842891, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03842891).

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times