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Factors influencing quality of life in children with tracheostomy with emphasis on home care visits: a multi-centre investigation.

Authors
  • Mirza, B1
  • Marouf, A2
  • Abi Sheffah, F2
  • Marghlani, O2, 3
  • Heaphy, J2
  • Alherabi, A2, 3
  • Zawawi, F1
  • Alnoury, I1
  • Al-Khatib, T1, 2
  • 1 Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah.
  • 2 Department of Surgery, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Section, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Jeddah.
  • 3 Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Umm Al-Qura University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. , (Saudi Arabia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Laryngology & Otology
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2023
Volume
137
Issue
10
Pages
1102–1109
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S002221512200202X
PMID: 36089743
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Only a few studies have assessed the quality of life in children with tracheostomies. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of life and the factors influencing it in these children. This cross-sectional, two-centre study was conducted on paediatric patients living in the community with a tracheostomy by using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Clinical and demographic information of patients, as well as parents' socioeconomic factors, were obtained. A total of 53 patients met our inclusion criteria, and their parents agreed to participate. The mean age of patients was 6.85 years, and 21 patients were ventilator-dependent. The total paediatric health-related quality of life score was 59.28, and the family impact score was 68.49. In non-ventilator-dependent patients, multivariate analyses indicated that social functioning and health-related quality of life were negatively affected by the duration of tracheostomy. The Quality of Life of ventilator-dependent patients was influenced by care visits and the presence of pulmonary co-morbidities. Children with tracheostomies have a lower quality of life than healthy children do. Routine care visits by a respiratory therapist and nurses yielded significantly improved quality of life in ventilator-dependent children.

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