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Facilitators and barriers to implementing antimicrobial stewardship strategies: Results from a qualitative study.

Authors
  • Pakyz, Amy L1
  • Moczygemba, Leticia R2
  • VanderWielen, Lynn M3
  • Edmond, Michael B4
  • Stevens, Michael P4
  • Kuzel, Anton J5
  • 1 Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science, School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science, School of Pharmacy, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.
  • 3 Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.
  • 4 Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.
  • 5 Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of infection control
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2014
Volume
42
Issue
10 Suppl
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2014.04.023
PMID: 25239719
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Many hospitals have implemented antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and have included in their programs strategies such as prior authorization and audit and feedback. However there are few data concerning the facilitators and barriers that ASPs face when implementing their strategies. We conducted a qualitative study to discern factors that lead to successful uptake of ASP strategies. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted from June-July 2013 with 15 ASP member pharmacists and 6 physicians representing 21 unique academic medical centers. Successful implementation of ASP strategies was found to be related to communication style, types of relationships formed between the ASP and non-ASP personnel, and conflict management. Success was also influenced by the availability of resources in the form of adequate personnel, health information technology personnel and infrastructure, and the ability to generate and analyze ASP-specific data. Types of effective strategies commonly cited included audit and feedback; prior authorization, especially with an educative component; and use of real-time alert technology and guidelines. Several factors may influence ASP success in the implementation of their strategies. ASP members may use these findings to improve upon the success of their programs. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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