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Face (and nose) priming for book: the malleability of semantic memory.

Authors
  • Coane, Jennifer H
  • Balota, David A
Type
Published Article
Journal
Experimental psychology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2011
Volume
58
Issue
1
Pages
62–70
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1027/1618-3169/a000068
PMID: 20494866
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

There are two general classes of models of semantic structure that support semantic priming effects. Feature-overlap models of semantic priming assume that shared features between primes and targets are critical (e.g., cat-DOG). Associative accounts assume that contextual co-occurrence is critical and that the system is organized along associations independent of featural overlap (e.g., leash-DOG). If unrelated concepts can become related as a result of contextual co-occurrence, this would be more supportive of associative accounts and provide insight into the nature of the network underlying "semantic" priming effects. Naturally co-occurring recent associations (e.g., face-BOOK) were tested under conditions that minimize strategic influences (i.e., short stimulus onset asynchrony and low relatedness proportion) in a semantic priming paradigm. Priming for new associations did not differ from the priming found for pre-existing relations (e.g., library-BOOK). Mediated priming (e.g., nose-BOOK) was also found. These results suggest that contextual associations can result in the reorganization of the network that subserves "semantic" priming effects.

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