Affordable Access

Publisher Website

Activated Membrane Patches Guide Chemotactic Cell Motility

Authors
Journal
PLoS Computational Biology
1553-734X
Publisher
Public Library of Science
Publication Date
Volume
7
Issue
6
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002044
Keywords
  • Research Article
  • Biology
  • Biophysics
  • Biophysics Simulations
  • Cell Motility
  • Computational Biology
  • Biophysic Al Simulations
Disciplines
  • Ecology
  • Geography
  • Physics

Abstract

Many eukaryotic cells are able to crawl on surfaces and guide their motility based on environmental cues. These cues are interpreted by signaling systems which couple to cell mechanics; indeed membrane protrusions in crawling cells are often accompanied by activated membrane patches, which are localized areas of increased concentration of one or more signaling components. To determine how these patches are related to cell motion, we examine the spatial localization of RasGTP in chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells under conditions where the vertical extent of the cell was restricted. Quantitative analyses of the data reveal a high degree of spatial correlation between patches of activated Ras and membrane protrusions. Based on these findings, we formulate a model for amoeboid cell motion that consists of two coupled modules. The first module utilizes a recently developed two-component reaction diffusion model that generates transient and localized areas of elevated concentration of one of the components along the membrane. The activated patches determine the location of membrane protrusions (and overall cell motion) that are computed in the second module, which also takes into account the cortical tension and the availability of protrusion resources. We show that our model is able to produce realistic amoeboid-like motion and that our numerical results are consistent with experimentally observed pseudopod dynamics. Specifically, we show that the commonly observed splitting of pseudopods can result directly from the dynamics of the signaling patches.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.