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THE SCOTTISH SOCIETY OF THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE: REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS, SESSION 1971-72

Journal
Medical History
0025-7273
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Publication Date
Keywords
  • Main Articles
Disciplines
  • Criminology
  • Medicine

Abstract

THE SCOTTISH SOCIETY OF THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE REPORT OF PROCEEDINGS Session 1971-72 Another successful session has come to an end with membership of the Society well maintained and attendances at meetings encouraging. The usual three meetings were held, the Annual General Meeting at Edinburgh in October 1971, and two ordinary meetings at Glasgow and Stirling in February and June 1972 respectively. MEDICO-HISTORICAL NOTES The death of Professor-Emeritus John Glaister took place on 4 October 1971. He occupied the regius chair of forensic medicine at Glasgow University for thirty-one years. Like his father who held the same chair before him, Professor Glaister was a distinguished figure in the field of forensic medicine, especially in Scotland. But it was an English murder that made him well known to the public at large throughout Britain. With the late Professors Sir Sydney Smith and James C. Brash of Edinburgh, Glaister solved the riddle of the human remains which led to the conviction of Dr. Buck Ruxton in 1936. Glaister also claimed to have helped Erle Stanley Gardner in the writing of some of the latter's Perry Mason stories. Only a few months before Glaister's death, Dr. J. Malcolm Cameron, in a paper delivered at Aberdeen, be- moaned the fact that academic forensic medicine in Britain was in danger of extinction. Referring to the rise and fall of the discipline since the foundation of the first chair in Britain at Edinburgh in 1807, all the established chairs in England and Wales had lapsed though there were still personal ones in London. One chair, the regius chair of forensic medicine at Glasgow, is the only one filled at present in Scotland. Following the recommendation of the Royal Commission on Medical Education, 1965-68, that an organization should be formed to play a major part in training for community medicine, the Presidents of the Royal Colleges of Physicians of Edinburgh and London and of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow announced, in October 1971,

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