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The Extracellular Matrix Receptor Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Regulates Collagen Transcription by Translocating to the Nucleus.

Authors
  • Chiusa, Manuel1
  • Hu, Wen1
  • Liao, Hong-Jun1
  • Su, Yan1
  • Borza, Corina M1
  • de Caestecker, Mark P1
  • Skrypnyk, Nataliya I1
  • Fogo, Agnes B2
  • Pedchenko, Vadim1
  • Li, Xiyue1
  • Zhang, Ming-Zhi1
  • Hudson, Billy G1
  • Basak, Trayambak1
  • Vanacore, Roberto M1
  • Zent, Roy1, 3
  • Pozzi, Ambra4, 3
  • 1 Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, and.
  • 2 Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee; and.
  • 3 Department of Veterans Affairs, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • 4 Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, and [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Publisher
American Society of Nephrology
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2019
Volume
30
Issue
9
Pages
1605–1624
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2018111160
PMID: 31383731
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is activated by collagens, upregulated in injured and fibrotic kidneys, and contributes to fibrosis by regulating extracellular matrix production, but how DDR1 controls fibrosis is poorly understood. DDR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). RTKs can translocate to the nucleus via a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) present on the receptor itself or a ligand it is bound to. In the nucleus, RTKs regulate gene expression by binding chromatin directly or by interacting with transcription factors. To determine whether DDR1 translocates to the nucleus and whether this event is mediated by collagen-induced DDR1 activation, we generated renal cells expressing wild-type or mutant forms of DDR1 no longer able to bind collagen. Then, we determined the location of the DDR1 upon collagen stimulation. Using both biochemical assays and immunofluorescence, we analyzed the steps involved in DDR1 nuclear translocation. We show that although DDR1 and its natural ligand, collagen, lack an NLS, DDR1 is present in the nucleus of injured human and mouse kidney proximal tubules. We show that DDR1 nuclear translocation requires collagen-mediated receptor activation and interaction of DDR1 with SEC61B, a component of the Sec61 translocon, and nonmuscle myosin IIA and β-actin. Once in the nucleus, DDR1 binds to chromatin to increase the transcription of collagen IV, a major collagen upregulated in fibrosis. These findings reveal a novel mechanism whereby activated DDR1 translates to the nucleus to regulate synthesis of profibrotic molecules. Copyright © 2019 by the American Society of Nephrology.

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