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Extended survival and reproductive potential of single-sex male and female Schistosoma japonicum within definitive hosts.

Authors
  • Lu, Da-Bing1
  • Yu, Qiu-Fu2
  • Zhang, Jie-Ying2
  • Sun, Meng-Tao2
  • Gu, Man-Man2
  • Webster, Joanne P3
  • Liang, You-Sheng4
  • 1 Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou, China; Key Laboratory of National Health and Family Planning Commission on Parasitic Disease Control and Prevention, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory on Parasite and Vector Control Technology, Jiangsu Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Wuxi, China. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 2 Department of Epidemiology and Statistics, School of Public Health, Soochow University, Suzhou, China; Key Laboratory of National Health and Family Planning Commission on Parasitic Disease Control and Prevention, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory on Parasite and Vector Control Technology, Jiangsu Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Wuxi, China. , (China)
  • 3 Key Laboratory of National Health and Family Planning Commission on Parasitic Disease Control and Prevention, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory on Parasite and Vector Control Technology, Jiangsu Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Wuxi, China; Centre for Emerging, Endemic and Exotic Diseases (CEEED), Department of Pathology and Population Sciences, Royal Veterinary College, University of London, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: [email protected] , (China)
  • 4 Key Laboratory of National Health and Family Planning Commission on Parasitic Disease Control and Prevention, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory on Parasite and Vector Control Technology, Jiangsu Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Wuxi, China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
International journal for parasitology
Publication Date
Oct 01, 2021
Volume
51
Issue
11
Pages
887–891
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpara.2021.03.005
PMID: 33905765
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Schistosomiasis is caused by dioecious helminths of the genus Schistosoma. Recent work indicated that unpaired female and male schistosomes can survive within their definitive host for at least 1 year, although the viability or fertility of these worms after subsequent pairing remained untested. We performed two experiments on laboratory mice, one with female Schistosoma japonicum exposure first and male schistosomes second and another vice versa. After surviving as single-sex unpaired forms for up to 1 year, 58.5% of male and 70% of female schistosomes were able to mate and produce viable eggs. This highlights an additional biological challenge in achieving elimination of schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2021 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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