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Exposure to synthetic oxytocin during delivery and its effect on psychomotor development.

Authors
  • González-Valenzuela, María-José1
  • López-Montiel, Dolores2
  • González-Mesa, Ernesto Santiago3
  • 1 Dpto Psicología Evolutiva y de la Educación, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de Málaga, Campus Universitario de Teatinos, s/n Málaga, 29071, Spain. [email protected]
  • 2 Dpto Psicobiología y Metodología de las Ciencias del Comportamiento, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad de Málaga Campus Universitario de Teatinos, s/n Málaga, 29071, Spain.
  • 3 Dpto Cirugía, Obstetricia y Ginecología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Málaga, Campus Universitario de Teatinos, s/n Málaga, 29071, Spain.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Developmental Psychobiology
Publisher
Wiley (John Wiley & Sons)
Publication Date
December 2015
Volume
57
Issue
8
Pages
908–920
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1002/dev.21321
PMID: 26011378
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The main objective is to examine the influence of oxytocin administration during delivery on psychomotor development at age five years. This was a retrospective cohort study involving two groups: children of mothers exposed vs. not exposed to oxytocin during labor. Of the 7,465 newborns registered in our maternity service during 2006 we randomly selected an initial sample of 400 children. Of these, 146 children were assessed using the motor scale of the Battelle Developmental Inventory. Other predictor variables that could potentially act as confounders and/or interact with the main relationship were also examined. The data were subjected to bivariate analysis, estimates of measures of strength of association, stratified analysis and multivariate binary logistic regression. The results indicate that exposure to synthetic oxytocin during delivery is an independent risk factor for a delay in gross and fine motor development. This was the case after controlling for the variables duration of labor and sex of the newborn, none of which modified the effect of oxytocin on gross and fine motor development. However, sex of the newborn were shown to be confounding gross motor development. In light of these results, and with the aim of preventing possible psychomotor alterations, further studies are now needed to analyze the effect that the oxytocin dose and the duration of perfusion may have on children's subsequent development.

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