Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Exploring metal availability in the natural niche of Streptococcus pneumoniae to discover potential vaccine antigens

Authors
  • van Beek, Lucille F.1, 2
  • Surmann, Kristin3
  • van den Berg van Saparoea, H. Bart4
  • Houben, Diane4
  • Jong, Wouter S. P.4
  • Hentschker, Christian3
  • Ederveen, Thomas H. A.5
  • Mitsi, Elena6
  • Ferreira, Daniela M.6
  • van Opzeeland, Fred1, 2
  • van der Gaast – de Jongh, Christa E.1, 2
  • Joosten, Irma1
  • Völker, Uwe3
  • Schmidt, Frank3, 7
  • Luirink, Joen4, 8
  • Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A.1, 2
  • de Jonge, Marien I.1, 2
  • 1 Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, The Netherlands
  • 2 Radboud Center for Infectious Diseases, The Netherlands
  • 3 University Medicine Greifswald, Germany , (Germany)
  • 4 Abera Bioscience AB, Sweden , (Sweden)
  • 5 Radboud University Medical Center, The Netherlands
  • 6 Respiratory Infection Group, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • 7 Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar, Qatar , (Qatar)
  • 8 Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Type
Published Article
Journal
Virulence
Publisher
Landes Bioscience
Publication Date
Oct 05, 2020
Volume
11
Issue
1
Pages
1310–1328
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/21505594.2020.1825908
PMID: 33017224
PMCID: PMC7550026
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

Nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae is a prerequisite for pneumococcal transmission and disease. Current vaccines protect only against disease and colonization caused by a limited number of serotypes, consequently allowing serotype replacement and transmission. Therefore, the development of a broadly protective vaccine against colonization, transmission and disease is desired but requires a better understanding of pneumococcal adaptation to its natural niche. Hence, we measured the levels of free and protein-bound transition metals in human nasal fluid, to determine the effect of metal concentrations on the growth and proteome of S. pneumoniae . Pneumococci cultured in medium containing metal levels comparable to nasal fluid showed a highly distinct proteomic profile compared to standard culture conditions, including the increased abundance of nine conserved, putative surface-exposed proteins. AliA, an oligopeptide binding protein, was identified as the strongest protective antigen, demonstrated by the significantly reduced bacterial load in a murine colonization and a lethal mouse pneumonia model, highlighting its potential as vaccine antigen.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times