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Exploring how product descriptors and packaging colors impact consumers' perceptions of plant-based meat alternative products.

Authors
  • Sucapane, Daniella1
  • Roux, Caroline2
  • Sobol, Kamila1
  • 1 Concordia University, John Molson School of Business, 1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, QC, H3G 1M8, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Concordia University, John Molson School of Business, 1455 De Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, QC, H3G 1M8, Canada. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Canada)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Appetite
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2021
Volume
167
Pages
105590–105590
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.appet.2021.105590
PMID: 34242733
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

While consumers have been increasingly trying to reduce their meat consumption due to rising concerns about its impact on their health and the environment, many still find animal-based foods more attractive than plant-based foods, thus hindering their adoption. Could marketing cues such as product descriptors and packaging colors help make these products more attractive to consumers? Across two studies, we tested the effects of product descriptors and packaging colors on meat eating consumers' perceptions of, and behavioral intentions toward, plant-based meat alternative products. Study 1 revealed that a "plant-based" (vs. "meat alternative") descriptor positively impacted perceptions of healthiness and eco-friendliness, as well as trial likelihood, and negatively impacted predicted quantity consumed. Study 2 provided some evidence for the moderating role of packaging color, and more specifically for the (mis)matching effects of product descriptor and packaging color on product perceptions and behavioral intentions. Results revealed that, when using a "meat alternative" descriptor, mismatching (vs. matching) it with a green (vs. red) packaging color negatively impacted perceptions of eco-friendliness and trial likelihood. Conversely, when using a "plant-based" descriptor, matching (vs. mismatching) it with a green (vs. red) packaging color negatively impacted predicted satiety. Overall, our research suggests that marketing cues can, to some extent, impact consumers' perceptions of plant-based meat alternative products and related behavioral intentions, and offers many avenues for future research. Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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