Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Explaining variance in perceived research misbehavior: results from a survey among academic researchers in Amsterdam

Authors
  • Haven, Tamarinde1
  • Tijdink, Joeri1, 2
  • Martinson, Brian3, 4, 5
  • Bouter, Lex1, 6
  • Oort, Frans7
  • 1 Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, Amsterdam, 1081 HV, The Netherlands , Amsterdam (Netherlands)
  • 2 Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, Netherlands , Amsterdam (Netherlands)
  • 3 HealthPartners Institute, 8170 33rd Ave. S., Bloomington, MN, 55425, USA , Bloomington (United States)
  • 4 Center for Care Delivery and Outcomes Research, Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Health Care System, One Veterans Drive, Minneapolis, MN, 55417, USA , Minneapolis (United States)
  • 5 University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA , Minneapolis (United States)
  • 6 Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1117, Amsterdam, The Netherlands , Amsterdam (Netherlands)
  • 7 University of Amsterdam, Nieuwe Achtergracht 127, Amsterdam, 1018 WS, The Netherlands , Amsterdam (Netherlands)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Research Integrity and Peer Review
Publisher
Springer (Biomed Central Ltd.)
Publication Date
May 03, 2021
Volume
6
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s41073-021-00110-w
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundConcerns about research misbehavior in academic science have sparked interest in the factors that may explain research misbehavior. Often three clusters of factors are distinguished: individual factors, climate factors and publication factors. Our research question was: to what extent can individual, climate and publication factors explain the variance in frequently perceived research misbehaviors?MethodsFrom May 2017 until July 2017, we conducted a survey study among academic researchers in Amsterdam. The survey included three measurement instruments that we previously reported individual results of and here we integrate these findings.ResultsOne thousand two hundred ninety-eight researchers completed the survey (response rate: 17%). Results showed that individual, climate and publication factors combined explained 34% of variance in perceived frequency of research misbehavior. Individual factors explained 7%, climate factors explained 22% and publication factors 16%.ConclusionsOur results suggest that the perceptions of the research climate play a substantial role in explaining variance in research misbehavior. This suggests that efforts to improve departmental norms might have a salutary effect on behavior.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times