Explaining the de-prioritization of primary prevention: Physicians' perceptions of their role in the delivery of primary care

Affordable Access

Explaining the de-prioritization of primary prevention: Physicians' perceptions of their role in the delivery of primary care

Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
May 02, 2003
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Medicine
License
Unknown

Abstract

1471-2458-3-15.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Public Health Open AcceResearch article Explaining the de-prioritization of primary prevention: Physicians' perceptions of their role in the delivery of primary care Amy L Mirand*1, Gregory P Beehler2, Christina L Kuo3 and Martin C Mahoney1,4 Address: 1Department of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, 2Department of Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA, 3Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA and 4Department of Family Medicine, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA Email: Amy L Mirand* - [email protected]; Gregory P Beehler - [email protected]; Christina L Kuo - [email protected]; Martin C Mahoney - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: While physicians are key to primary preventive care, their delivery rate is sub- optimal. Assessment of physician beliefs is integral to understanding current behavior and the conceptualization of strategies to increase delivery. Methods: A focus group with regional primary care physician (PCP) Opinion Leaders was conducted as a formative step towards regional assessment of attitudes and barriers regarding preventive care delivery in primary care. Following the PRECEDE-PROCEED model, the focus group aim was to identify conceptual themes that characterize PCP beliefs and practices regarding preventive care. Seven male and five female PCPs (family medicine, internal medicine) participated in the audiotaped discussion of their perceptions and behaviors in delivery of primary preventive care. The transcribed audiotape was qualitatively analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Results: The PCPs' own perceived role in daily practice was a significant

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times